Home Fires (Common Law #4) by Kate Sherwood

Trouble comes to Mosely, Montana, from the outside world. When the residents of Mosely are left on their own, they can make things work. Sure, there’s always been a militia operating up in the hills, but they were small-scale—just survivalists doing their thing—until organizers came in from out of state. Now Jericho Crewe and the rest of the sheriff’s department are facing down a heavily armed band of fanatics, and the feds are busy elsewhere.
The odds are hopeless, but Jericho swore an oath to serve and protect the citizens of Mosely. He won’t walk away from that, even if Wade Granger’s begging him to run away somewhere and finally be together the way they always should have been.
But this time, it’s Jericho who refuses to leave Mosely, even if staying kills him.

Well, if things had to end… okay, so I’m still not happy about this series being over, but Kate Sherwood did an amazing job of wrapping things up for Wade and Jericho.

Jericho was so close to quitting, so close. Then things got even crazier in Mosely. So crazy that even Wade was ready to pack it up and move on, but Jericho couldn’t do it. Not when people he cared about were too close to getting caught in the cross fire, literally. There’s not a whole lot more to say than what you see in the description, except Wade blew me away in Home Fires. I honestly thought he was ready to call it quits, but then… yeah, you’ve gotta read this one to get the whole ‘Wade’ affect.

Common Law is the only series by Kate Sherwood that I’ve read. Actually, I’ve only read one other book by her and Mark of Cain kind of left me reeling. This series did the same in a whole different way. It also made me realize that I really need to add more books by this author to my TBR list. As I said in the beginning, I’m sad to say good-bye to these characters. There were a few that I wanted to get to know a little better and even more that I would have liked to ‘check in on’ to make sure they weathered through all the craziness that happened in Home Fires. They were all left in a pretty good place in the end though, so saying goodbye wasn’t quite as hard as I thought it was going to be. 😉

Darkness (Common Law #3) by Kate Sherwood

darkness_500x750A murdered prostitute. An obvious suspect. Clear evidence. For once, Jericho Crewe has a straightforward crime to investigate, and Wade Granger isn’t involved.
It all seems so simple, but Jericho’s instincts won’t let him rest. As he investigates, he finds troubling suggestions that the murder is a part of something larger and more sinister. But working within the boundaries of the law may keep him from finding the truth. If Jericho doesn’t break the rules, an innocent man may rot in jail while a killer remains free to strike again.
Inevitably, it all comes back to Wade. Because who else knows as much about breaking rules? And who else knows Jericho the way Wade does—not wisely, but far, far too well?

This series really knows how to blur the lines between right and wrong. It’s pretty clear where those lines converge by the description of Darkness. It’s also getting harder for Jericho to ignore Wade’s twisted logic, especially when the law doesn’t seem to be on the right side of things.

Jericho doesn’t always follow the book, but outright breaking the law isn’t something he’s willing to do. Wade doesn’t have the same black and white vision that Jericho has and in Darkness, there doesn’t seem to be any other way to free an innocent man and keep the guilty man from walking away. This book puts both men (Jericho and Wade) on the line and the story is intense, in more ways than one.

I love the dynamic between Jericho and Wade in the Common Law series. Wade’s not any easier to figure out for the reader than he is for Jericho, but it’s obvious that there’s more to him than his shady dealings. It’s obvious he cares, which is what keeps Jericho coming back even though he knows it’s not the smart thing to do – which he’s reminded of on a regular basis by other characters who care about him. Jericho sees something in Wade that others don’t though and that’s what keeps me wanting them to find a way to get past those blurred lines.

Darkness was a turning point. A couple of mysteries were solved and Wade and Jericho are definitely getting closer, but Kate Sherwood isn’t done with them yet. There’s one more book left in the Common Law series and as anxious as I am to read Home Fires I’m not quite ready to say good-bye. *sigh*

 

Embers (Common Law #2) by Kate Sherwood

embersSmall town—big problems. Jericho Crewe is back in Mosely, Montana, trying to deal with police corruption, interfering feds, his newly discovered family members, and, of course, Wade Granger.
He doesn’t really need a biker war on top of it all, but as the bodies start to pile up, it becomes pretty clear that’s what he’s got. Not only that, but Wade’s involved somehow, and as soon as Wade is a part of something, things that seemed clear become cloudy.
With the feds breathing down his neck, Jericho has to find his way through Wade’s maze of half truths and manipulations. It would all be so much easier if Jericho could think straight in the other man’s presence. So much easier if their passionate past could be forgotten, and if he could be sure he’s strong enough to resist the temptation of a passionate present.

CreativeDeedsReadsDisclosure1I love it when the second book in a series is just as good as the first – in this case, maybe even a little better 😉

In Embers, Jericho has agreed to support Kayla (his best friend from youth and the current sheriff) as her under sheriff. If things aren’t complicated enough, the FBI is back along with Jericho’s favorite DEA agents. All of them are locking Kayla and Jericho out of their investigations, so of course, Jericho takes things into his own hands. As expected, it all goes pretty much down hill from there.

There are so many twists and turns in Embers, it’s hard to keep up. Unexpected allies are made, secrets are revealed and even more mysteries are thrown into the mix. And as expected, Wade is in the middle of it all, as well as Jericho’s new found family.

There was even more sexual tension between Wade and Jericho in Embers. At times it seemed like they were taking two steps forward and five steps back. Sometimes it was hard to tell who was playing who. Since readers were only let in on Jericho’s POV, it’s hard to tell. My guess is that there is more to Wade than meets the eye, but that’s just a guess… a hopeful one. 🙂

The next book in the Common Law series is Darkness. There were enough things left unsolved at the end of Embers, I can’t wait to find out where things go from here.

DragonFlyGreen4-5

Long Shadows (Common Law #1) by Kate Sherwood

longshadowLA cop Jericho Crewe got the hell out of Mosely, Montana, when he was seventeen. Fifteen years later, he’s back, and everything is just as messed up as when he left. He planned a quick visit to deal with his injured father, but of course things are never that simple. Family complications, police complications, social complications—and, as always, Wade Granger complications.
Jericho and Wade had been so close, once upon a time. First friends, then more than friends—and then, after Jericho’s escape, nothing. Wade’s magnetism hasn’t been lessened by a decade and a half apart; even when Jericho learns that Wade is the prime suspect in the death of Jericho’s father, the old connection still sparks.
When Jericho’s newly discovered half siblings are kidnapped, he needs to trust someone to help him find them. Wade’s a terrible choice, but Jericho’s never been known for his good judgment. Anyway, he’d rather make a bad decision with Wade than a good one with anybody else.

CreativeDeedsReadsDisclosure1A cop who comes back to the town he escaped when he was a teenager. A friend/ex-lover who never left but blurs the lines of right and wrong on a regular basis. Oh, this series is going to be fun. 😉

Jericho had no intention of spending a lot of time in the town he ran from. He didn’t expect to find out his father was dead under questionable circumstances or family members he didn’t know he had either. To say things got interesting would be an understatement.

Long Shadows had plenty of mystery, action and suspense. Although there was little or no romance, there was plenty of romantic tension. There was also an added connection between Wade, Jericho and Kayla, the current Sheriff. Which made things even more interesting.

There are at least 3 more books in the Common Law series – Embers, Darkness and Home Fires. I’m pretty sure things are going to heat up… no pun attended. 😉

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Mark of Cain by Kate Sherwood

MarkOfCainWhen a man is consumed by hatred, is there anything left to love?
After a tough day of counseling sessions, Anglican priest Mark Webber is looking forward to a relaxing dinner at a local restaurant. When he sees who’s bellied up to the bar, though, he reaches for his cell phone to call the police.
It’s Lucas Cain, the man who killed Mark’s brother three years ago. Apparently he’s out of jail and hanging out with his old crowd, which has to be a breach of parole, right?
Pulled over upon leaving the bar, Lucas blows a clean breathalyzer and hopes this isn’t a harbinger of things to come. He’s ready to build a sober, peaceful life. His friends aren’t ready to let him move on, though, and he ends up taking refuge in an Anglican half-way house.
Thrown together, Mark and Lucas find common ground in the struggle to help a young gay man come to terms with his sexuality—and the fight against homophobic townsfolk. As attraction grows, the past is the last stumbling block between them and a future filled with hope.
Warning: Bad boys being good, good boys being bad.

CreativeDeedsReadsDisclosure1I have to be honest here. I’m still not really sure how I feel about Mark of Cain. I loved the message of forgiveness and healing. I liked Lucas and could see past the mistakes he made. I liked Mark and I could totally understand his anger toward Lucas. Looking back, I think my only reservation is the time frame. Mark was in the job of forgiveness and I understand how that forgiveness came about, but things happened just a little too fast. Other than that, Mark of Cain was a story that touched on prejudice, love and redemption in a powerful way.

I admired Mark and his devotion to the Church. The lines blurred for him though when that devotion went against what he truly believed and the politics of the Church he loved became more important to some than those he had promised to serve.

Lucas totally understood Mark’s hate toward him. He felt the same hatred toward himself. He worked hard to make himself a better person, but in a small town it’s hard to move beyond the person you once were. It took a lot of strength to walk away from his friends, but he did. From that point on, I gained more respect for him. He had no support, yet he didn’t give up and did everything in his power to make up for what he had done.

The supporting characters were great, especially the ones who could see beyond labels placed on individuals and saw the characters for who they were. Not all fences were mended by the end of Mark of Cain, but that’s okay. The story would have been less believable if they had been. This was my first Kate Sherwood read, and I doubt it will be my last.

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